policymic
policymic:

Homeless Jesus statue stirs controversy in N.C. town

Out in leafy, lakeside Davidson, N.C., an affluent college town 20 miles north of Charlotte, a sculpture of Jesus as a homeless man has sparked some local uproar. Lying blanketed and forlorn on a bench, “Homeless Jesus” has inspired a conversation about homelessness in general, appropriate depictions of Christ and at least one call for his arrest.
Read more 


This is brilliant.

policymic:

Homeless Jesus statue stirs controversy in N.C. town

Out in leafy, lakeside Davidson, N.C., an affluent college town 20 miles north of Charlotte, a sculpture of Jesus as a homeless man has sparked some local uproar. Lying blanketed and forlorn on a bench, “Homeless Jesus” has inspired a conversation about homelessness in general, appropriate depictions of Christ and at least one call for his arrest.

Read more 

This is brilliant.

theneuralnetwork
theneuralnetwork:

Peppermint’s cool and refreshing taste provides a welcome relief on warm days. The pleasant, cooling sensation associated with mojitos, mint tea and mentos is not simply imagination, but an intriguing illusion which plays on the mechanics of the brain. 
Temperature is detected by nerve endings in our skin, which projects the information to specialised warmth receptors in the brain. The temperature we feel is determined by which receptors are activated. However, these receptors can be tricked. Menthol, a chemical found in mint leaves, stimulates cold receptors, creating a feeling of coolness.
As a result, the brain responds as if you’re stepping into the shade every time you take a sip of mint tea.

theneuralnetwork:

Peppermint’s cool and refreshing taste provides a welcome relief on warm days. The pleasant, cooling sensation associated with mojitos, mint tea and mentos is not simply imagination, but an intriguing illusion which plays on the mechanics of the brain. 

Temperature is detected by nerve endings in our skin, which projects the information to specialised warmth receptors in the brain. The temperature we feel is determined by which receptors are activated. However, these receptors can be tricked. Menthol, a chemical found in mint leaves, stimulates cold receptors, creating a feeling of coolness.

As a result, the brain responds as if you’re stepping into the shade every time you take a sip of mint tea.